Tanya Fosdick, Head of Research, Agilysis & Nicola Wass, CEO of So-Mo-Co Ltd

Tanya Fosdick is an experienced researcher who specialises in translating complex evidence into practice. With more than a decade of experience in the road safety sector, especially in relation to young drivers and motorcyclists, Tanya seeks to bridge the gap between academia and practitioners to improve the quality of road safety interventions, particularly in the educational arena.

Tanya is head of research at Agilysis and principal research associate at Road Safety Analysis, leading research for both organisations and collaborating with the internal teams and often a variety of external experts to deliver projects.

Tanya's recent work includes exploring the issues relating to rural young drivers, adult pedestrians, occupational road risk, older drivers, the road safety performance of the Coalition Government and assessing the British Road Safety Statement.

In addition to research, Tanya has been leading evaluation projects since 2003, incorporating behaviour change theories into evaluation methodologies. She is currently involved in a variety of local and national evaluation projects exploring the efficacy of young driver, advanced driver training and motorcycle interventions.

As CEO of So-Mo-Co Ltd, Nicola Wass has pioneered the application of behavioural insight psychology to the design and delivery of behaviour change campaigns across the UK.

She is an acknowledged thought leader in innovative road safety behavioural change methodologies and has addressed national conferences. Her work has featured on Good Morning Britain, Radio 4, Wright Stuff and the One Show.

She is also the north west facilitator for the Cabinet Office and has delivered people-centred approaches to designing services and solutions for organisations ranging from the Department for International Trade, local authorities, hospital trusts and national charities.

Presentation: A Nudge in the Right Direction; Embedding Physical Nudges in some of the UK’s Most Dangerous Pedestrian Crossings

Behavioural science is poorly understood and under exploited by the public sector despite a growing body of evidence which demonstrates that, when applied correctly, it offers a reliable way to predict, understand and change human behaviour.

So-Mo and Agilysis, in partnership with Liverpool City Council and Hull City Council, are using applied behavioural science methodologies to develop and trial a real-world intervention intended to increase the number of people who use pedestrian crossings correctly.

The research is funded by the Road Safety Trust and will conclude in 2022. Whilst we will not be in a position to share results of the trials at this conference, this case study will demonstrate:

  • How insight led approaches can improve understanding of problem behaviours
  • How behavioural insights can inform solution design
  • How the research methodology we have created will allow us to conclusively measure the impact of our intervention